ICES Marine Science Symposia - Volume 219 - 2003 - Part 06 of 75.pdf (4 MB)
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Temperature and salinity in the central Labrador Sea during the 1990s and in the context of the longer-term change

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posted on 22.09.2022, 08:41 authored by Igor Yashayaev, John R. N. Lazier, R. Allyn Clarke
In the early years of the 1990s, in the Labrador Sea winters were exceptionally severe, while in the later years winters were relatively mild. High heat losses during the severe winters produced mixed layers increasing in depth to a maximum of 2300 m. This pool of convectively mixed water, Labrador Sea Water (LSW), is a well-recognized intermediate water mass in the North Atlantic Ocean. In the latter half of the decade, mixed layer depths, at less than 1500 m, were too shallow to maintain the recently created LSW. It slowly drained away from the Labrador Sea to other regions of the North Atlantic Ocean. This loss was balanced by a flow of warmer more saline water from the boundary currents. Changes in temperature and salinity associated with the build-up and decline of LSW over the decade are presented. Property variations in the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water and Denmark Strait Overflow Water lying below the LSW are also discussed.

History

Published under the auspices of the following ICES Steering Group or Committee

  • EPDSG

Published under the auspices of the following ICES Expert Group or Strategic Initiative

WGOH

Series

ICES Marine Science Symposia

Volume

219

ISSN

2708-9215

Recommended citation

Yashayaev, I., Lazier, J. R. N., and Clarke, R. A. 2003. Temperature and salinity in the central Labrador Sea during the 1990s and in the context of the longer-term change. ICES Marine Science Symposia, 219: 32-39. https://doi.org/10.17895/ices.pub.19271729